Restart by Gordon Korman

Image Courtesy of Amazon.com

“‘It’s the craziest feeling. I remember how to remember, but when I actually try to do it, I’m a blank. I’m like a computer with its hard drive wiped clean. You can reboot it and the operating system works fine. But when you look for a document or file to open, nothing’s there.

Not even my own name.”

Korman, Gordon. Restart.  Scholastic, 2017. 243 pages. Hardcover. $16.99, ISBN 978-1-338-05377-7

What if you couldn’t remember your whole life – all thirteen years of it? What if people acted really strange when they were near you, like almost afraid of you? What if you found out that you were responsible for doing some really awful things? What if you weren’t that person any more and had a second chance to be better? That’s what happened to Chase. The new Chase wouldn’t dream of doing the things the old Chase did. The new Chase has made friends with some of the very people he bullied in the past. But – has he really changed? Can he make the right decisions? Will he make the most of his second chance? You’ll have to read to find out. I loved everything about this story. It will make you laugh and it will make you mad. I was rooting for Chase, will you be?

Link to Amazon.com

Link to Worldcat.org

        Gordon Korman’s Website 

  and

Twitter Account 

 

 
Advertisements

Soar by Joan Bauer

 

51NxTrN8e9L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

Image courtesy of Amazon.com

 

“The problem with having a story like this is people don’t know what to do with it. Their faces get super sad and their shoulders slump as they pat me on the head, which I find irritating and say. ‘My, you are a little survivor, aren’t you?’

Bauer, Joan. Soar.  Viking, 2016. 296 pages. Hardcover. $16.99, ISBN 978-0-451-47034-8

There are a few things that you need to know about Jeremy Lopper. First, he is probably 12 years old. The other things you should know about him are that he was left at a water cooler in an office building with a note and a stuffed eagle when he was a baby. He was found by a single man named Walt, a computer genius, who later adopted him. The other thing you need to know is that Jeremy has had a heart transplant, and his new heart, that he has affectionately named Alice, is not working as great as everyone would have hoped.  Lastly, Walt and Jeremy love baseball!

Walt and Jeremy move to a small town where Walt has a consulting job. This town is all about baseball and Walt and Jeremy can’t wait to get there. When they arrive however, all is not as they had planned. There is an unexplained death and some unexpected secrets that surface which are tearing the town apart.

Here’s the most important thing you need to know about Jeremy though- he has THE BEST ATTITUDE about life and baseball. Will it be enough to help this town? Read this book to find out what happens to the town, baseball, Jeremy and Walt.

I love, love, loved every page of this book!

Want to watch a book trailer for Soar?

Link to Amazon.com (available in Hardcover, Paperback, Kindle versions, and Audible)

Link to Worldcat.org

 Joan Bauer

HRS Joan Bauer

Courtesy of Penguin Books

 Website 
 Twitter Account 
YouTube Channel
Facebook

 

 

House Arrest by K.A. Holt

Courtesy of FCPS OPAC

“‘Adjudicated delinquent. I had to look up how to spell that.Three times. I don’t feel like a delinquent and I don’t know what adjudicated means (even after looking it up). Sounds like a kung fu move. I adjudicated you in your face! HI-YA”

Holt, K. A.. House Arrest.  Chronicle Books, 2015. 296 pages. Hardcover. $16.99, ISBN 978-1-4521-3477-2

Did you ever do something wrong but for the right reason? I mean, something really wrong? Was it worth it? Would you do it again? Timothy (aka T-man) did and he has to write about it and his feelings in a journal for a year while he’s under house arrest. This book is written entirely in journal entries. It will make you laugh and it will make you cry. I highly recommend it. Read it and let me know what you think 🙂

Link to Amazon.com (available in Hardcover, Paperback, Kindle versions)

Link to Worldcat.org

K.A. Holt’s

Courtesy of kaholt.com

Courtesy of kaholt.com                                                                        

            Website 
               and
   Twitter Account 

 

 

Almost Home by Joan Bauer

Courtesy of Amazon.com

“I sighed. Sugar isn’t the easiest name to be slapped with, I’ll tell you. I was supposed to get named Susannah. I was supposed to be born in a hospital, too, but my whole life started as one big surprise when I got born in the back of a Chevy in the parking lot of the Sugar Shack in Baton Rouge in a rainstorm so bad, my parents couldn’t make it to the hospital. When I popped out and Reba saw the Sugar Shack sign, she felt it was a sign from God; right then I got my name. At least God told her to stop at Sugar. Sugar Shack Cole would have been a chore to live with. As for Mr. Leeland, he got the thrill of helping me be born, and believe me, he hasn’t done squat to help since.”

Bauer, Joan. Almost Home.  Viking, 2012. 264 pages. Hardcover. $16.99, ISBN 978-0-670-01289-3

Sugar Cole calls her parents Reba and Mr. Leeland. Mr. Leeland has a gambling problem and is gone way more than he’s around. He also spends more of Sugar and her mom’s money than he contributes. Sugar Cole is a character – she is always writing – and she never forgets all the advice her grandpa gave her over the years before his death. She is strong and doesn’t let the bullying at school get her down. She befriends her English teacher, Mr. Bennett, who encourages her to keep writing and is always lifting her up (don’t we all need someone like that?). Reba and Sugar get evicted from their home and find themselves in a new town and homeless. This is the breaking point for Reba and she ends up in the hospital. Sugar ends up in a foster home and learns what it’s like to live in a stable environment. She loves her new home but she loves her mom. You’ll have to read for yourself to see what happens. I think you’ll like it. This story is full of letters and e-mails written by Sugar, Mr. B, and her mom. It will make you laugh and it will make you cry. Give it a try.

 

Want to watch an interview with Joan Bauer? Here it is:

 “Almost. It’s a big word for me. I feel it everywhere. Almost home. Almost happy. Almost changed. Almost, but not quite. Not yet. Soon, maybe.” 
― Joan BauerAlmost Home

Courtesy of Penguin Books

 

 

 

 

Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D. Schmidt

Courtesy of Worldcat.org

“‘He won’t talk about what happened to him there. But since he left Stone Mountain, he won’t wear anything orange. He won’t let anyone stand behind him. He won’t go into rooms that are too small. And he won’t eat canned peaches.

Schmidt, Gary D. Orbiting Jupiter.  Clarion, 2015. 183 pages. Hardcover. $17.99, ISBN 978-0-544-46222-9

This story takes place in a small town in Maine – on a dairy farm – with a loving family who takes in a foster child. The family has one child of their own, Jack, who is twelve. Jack is the narrator of this story. They take in Joseph who is just a couple of years older than Jack. There are quite a few things that you learn about Joseph right away. He almost killed a teacher (after taking a drug that someone gave him when he was upset). He spent time at a juvenile prison facility called Stone Mountain. He has a daughter, Jupiter, who he has never met. When he arrives, he does very little talking. He has never had this kind of family life. He was raised by an abusive father. Over time he learns to trust this family and becomes friends with Jack. This is a story of a father’s undying love for his child. It is also a story of how far a family and a friend will go to help.

Gary Schmidt’s website, provides a link to the first chapter of the Orbiting Jupiter. Read it for yourself. I think you will be truly moved by the story.

HRS Black-Eyed Susan

Courtesy of www. public-domain-image.com

Orbiting Jupiter is a Grades 6-9 nominee for the 2016-2017 Black Eyed Susan Award. For more information go to the Maryland Association of School Librarians.

 

Gary Schmidt talks about his book Orbiting Jupiter:

Awards

  • Capitol Choices 2016
  • Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Books of 2015, Middle Grade
  • Booklist Best Young Adult Books of 2015
  • ALA Notable Books for Children 2016, Older Readers
  • VOYA’s Perfect Tens 2015; 2016 Winner, Notable Books for a Global Society
  • CCBC Choices 2016, Fiction for Young Adults
  • 2015 Cybils Awards Nomination, Young Adult Fiction

Courtesy of hmhbooks.com

 

 

Schooled by Gordon Korman

HRS Schooled

Courtesy of FCPS.org TLC

“‘I was thirteen the first time I saw a police officer up close. He was arresting me for driving without a license. At the time, I didn’t even know what a license was. I wasn’t too clear on what being arrested meant either.”

Korman, Gordon. Schooled.  Disney-Hyperion, 2008. 224 pages. Paperback. $5.99, ISBN 978-1423105169

Cap – short for Capricorn – has always lived on Garland Farm Commune, population two, with his grandmother, Rain. The only time he has left the farm is to pick up supplies. When Rain falls out of a tree and has to go to rehab, Cap is forced to live with a social worker, Florimunda, who just happened to live at the commune as a child. Cap is also enrolled in middle school for the first time ever. Imagine Cap – long hair – tye-dyed t-shirts – homemade sandals – being thrown into middle school. He’s never eaten pizza, watched TV, or played a video game. He practices tai chi on the school’s front lawn. Zach, big man on campus, is out to get him by getting him elected president, so that he can humiliate him. Can Cap survive middle school? What’s going to happen to him?

Link to Amazon.com

Link to Worldcat.org

Available in:

Courtesy of Amazon.com

Gordon Korman’s
 Website 
and
Twitter Account 

 

 

Framed by Gordon Korman

“‘We do trust you,’ Mom soothed. ‘It’s just that most parents don’t even go through this once. Our street is starting to look like the parking lot of the police station.'”

Korman, Gordon. Framed.  Scholastic, 2010. 234 pages. Hardcover. $8.99, ISBN 978-0-545-27081-6

Griffin Bing, “The Man with the Plan”, has a history of getting in trouble. Always in the name of “fairness” but still, he’s got a reputation. This time though, he didn’t do it. A Super Bowl ring, donated to his Middle School has gone missing from the school display case. It was replaced with Griffin’s retainer, making Griffin the prime suspect. What follows will keep you on the edge of your seat. There’s an appearance before the judge, a transfer to a JFK school, affectionately called “Jail for Kids”, a foiled plan with his friends to find out who the real thief is, an ankle bracelet that prevents him from leaving home, and much, much, more. Will the true thief be discovered? Will Griffin have to go to jail? You’ve got to read this one to find out.

Link to Amazon.com

Link to Worldcat.org

Available in:

Courtesy of Amazon.com

Gordon Korman’s
 Website 
and
Twitter Account 

 

 

Planet Middle School by Nikki Grimes

“Tom Boy. What does that even mean? And where did it come from? And if there’s a Tom Boy, how come there’s no Jane Girl? I’m just saying’.” 

Grimes, Nikki. Planet Middle School.  Bloomsbury, 2011. 154 pages. Hardcover. $15.99, ISBN 978-1-59990-284-5

Joylin is twelve years old and a tom boy. She loves to play basketball. She doesn’t wear dresses or makeup. Her best friends are Jake and KeeLee. Keelee is a PK (preacher’s kid). All is great until her body starts to change on the inside and the outside and then – things get interesting. She starts to notice the boys and she starts to want to be noticed. You’ll have to read this heart warming and humorous novel in poem form to find out if Joylin stays true to who she is?

Link to Amazon.com

Link to Worldcat.org

Available in:

 
Nikki Grimes’ Website 

 

 

Dork Diaries: Tales from a Not-So-Fabulous Life by Rachel Renee Russell

Cover Courtesy of Worldcat.org

Nikki is starting a new school and has problems just like every other eighth grade girl. She wants a cell phone, new friends, a boyfriend, to be popular and cool, and to beat her biggest enemy in the big art show. Her diary will tell you all about it!

Russell, Rachel Renee. Dork Diaries: Tales from a Not-So-Fabulous Life. Aladdin, 2009. 282   pages. Hardcover. $12.99, ISBN 978-1-4424-0774-9

Fourteen year-old Nikki is having a rough start to eighth grade. She wants a cell phone but her parents won’t give her one, she is starting at a new school where she feels invisible, she has no friends (yet) and she is the target of abuse from the most popular girl at the school, MacKenzie Hollister. Dork Diaries: Tales from a NOT-SO – Fabulous Life is Nikki’s journal, in her own handwriting, complete with some pretty awesome drawings. Have you ever wanted to know what people are really thinking? Face it, how often do we say what we’re really thinking? Nikki is always saying some pretty bold stuff – “But I just say it inside my head, so no one really hears it except me.” If you want to find out what Nikki is thinking and see if she makes any friends, including maybe a boyfriend, and see if she can just be herself at Westchester Country Day, then read this book. You will laugh and cry right along with Nikki.

Link to Amazon.com

Link to Worldcat.org

Available in:

Hardcover

Paperback

Kindle Edition

Audio

Awards:

New York Times Best Sellers

USA Today Best Sellers list

2010 Children’s Choice Book of the Year Award for the 5th/6th grade division

Book of the Year by the Nickelodeon Kid’s Choice Awards nominee

Book Trailer:

Book Trailer Courtesy of YouTube.com

English: Photo of author Rachel Renee Russell

Courtesy of commons.wikipedia.org

Rachel Renee Russell Information

Facebook Account

Twitter Account

Official Dork Diaries Website

Interview with Rachel Renee Russell:

Courtesy of YouTube.com

© Chris Peeler 2013